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808 134th St. SW, Suite 101
Everett, WA 98204

(425) 508-5872

Leadership Snohomish County (LSC) is a nonprofit that connects, ignites and develops county-specific sustainable leaders to strengthen our communities. Each year, we help experienced and emerging leaders in Snohomish County gain an understanding of the critical issues affecting the region and the stewardship capabilities needed to resolve them. Through our nine-month Signature Program and Young Professionals Program, we work in small teams with the business, government and nonprofit sectors as Community Impact Project Partners. LSC features more than 700 alumni who remain strongly invested in Snohomish County.

Step Up 2018

On April 20th, 2018 Leadership Snohomish County once again convened our county to discuss Racial Equity at STEP UP: Moving Racial Equity Forward at the Lynnwood Convention Center. With more than 600 participants, this is the largest annual racial equity event in the region.

For STEP 2018 videos, and other links and resources, visit our STEP UP Toolkit.

STEP UP 2018 SCHEDULE

REGISTRATION BEGINS: 7:30 AM

 

8:00 - 8:15 AM Welcome!

Northwest Tap Connection

Mayor Nicola Smith, City of Lynnwood

Executive Dave Somers, Snohomish County

Dr. Robin Fenn, Superintendent Verdant Health, LSC Executive Board

Kathy Coffey, Executive Director, Leadership Snohomish County

 

8:15 - 9:15 AM Keynote Speaker 

Ijeoma Oluo

Beyond Hearts and Minds: Focusing on the Work of Anti-Racism

 

9:15 - 9:30 AM Break

 

9:30 - 11:30 AM Workshops

Dr. Brett Kuwada, Psy.D.

Cultural Humility, Empathy, & Compassion: A Framework for Difficult Dialogue and Deeper Interpersonal and Organizational Connection

 

Ivan Gaskin

How You Were Taught to Hate Black People

 

Dr. Yvonne Terrell-Powell

It’s a Leadership Responsibility. If Not You, than Who?

 

Janice Tufte and Gus Mansour

Islam 202: After the First Salam

 

The Tulalip Tribe Treaty Rights Office: Patti Gobin and Ryan Miller

Sovereignty, Culture & Resilience

 

11:30 AM - 12:45 PM Lunch break

 

12:45 -1:00 PM Welcome back!

 

Kathy Coffey, Executive Director, Leadership Snohomish County

Azrael Howell reads "inefficiency."

 

1:00 - 2:00 PM Keynote Speaker

 

Dr. Nate Bowling

Taking a Stand in Polarizing Times

 

2:00 - 2:15 PM Break

 

2:15 - 4:15 PM Workshops

 

Sharonne Navas

Media and Our Implicit Bias

 

Jim Henderson and Jim Hancock

NO JOKE PRESENTS Three Practices for Crossing the Difference Divide

 

The Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve

Introduction: Our Journey to Becoming the Tulalip People

 

Karena Hooks and Andrea Paull

Making Connections: Culturally Responsive Teaching, Race, & the Brain

 

José L. Garcia-Pabón, Ph.D.

Why Don’t They Come? Latinos in Outreach Programs

 

Tami L. Farber

Developing a Power Analysis to Guide your Equity Work


Workshops & DETAILS

Main Gathering Room (ROOM: 2DE)

MORNING SESSION

Northwest Tap Connection

Northwest Tap Connection is a distinctive urban dance studio specializing in Rhythm Tap. The studio's philosophy is that dance enriches the lives of the students, while developing self-discipline, instilling self-confidence, and encouraging achievement and goal setting.

Northwest Tap Connection is dedicated to building the whole dancer through a love of dance, personal discipline, respect for the community, respect for fellow dancers, and knowledge of the history of the art form. We provide an environment where dancers can grow artistically and technically, and at the same time can develop leadership skills and social responsibility.

 

Morning Keynote Speaker

Ijeoma Oluo

Beyond Hearts and Minds: Focusing on the Work of Anti-Racism

Ijeoma Oluo is a Seattle-based writer, speaker, and Internet Yeller.  She’s the author of the New York Times Best-Seller So You Want to Talk about Race, published in January by Seal Press. Named one of the The Root’s 100 Most Influential African Americans in 2017, one of the Most Influential People in Seattle by Seattle Magazine, one of the 50 Most Influential Women in Seattle by Seattle Met, and winner of the of the 2018 Feminist Humanist Award by the American Humanist Society, Oluo’s work focuses primarily on issues of race and identity, feminism, social and mental health, social justice, the arts, and personal essay. Her writing has been featured in The Washington Post, NBC News, Elle Magazine, TIME, The Stranger, and the Guardian, among other outlets. http://www.ijeomaoluo.com/

ROOM: 1D

Ivan Gaskin

Workshop Title: How You Were Taught to Hate Black People

Facilitator: Azreal Howard

Ivan Gaskin was born in Atlanta and raised just north of Seattle and has two passions in life. Building things and provoking thought. His passion for the first began as an entrepreneur at the age of seven. This theme of building things continued as Ivan took the same hustle that he learned from his mother and father, and applied them to academics, earning scholarships to a private high School and eventually one to Morehouse College. Upon graduation in 2016, Ivan co-founded a tech company but would go on to work for Deloitte Consulting. All the while, Ivan has continued to provoke thought through high-energy presentations, poetry and key notes on stages ranging from Dell Technologies in Providence Rhode Island, to the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. All of these opportunities have allowed him to continually share his gifts with the world and continue to learn from it in the process. https://www.ivangaskin.com/

 

ROOM: 2BC

The Tulalip Tribe Treaty Rights Office: Patti Gobin and Ryan Miller

Sovereignty, Culture & Resilience

Facilitator: Marjorie James

Patti Gobin is the Special Projects Manager for the Tulalip Tribes. Patti has over 25 years of community development experience with the Tulalip Tribes. Presently, Patti is involved in the strategic planning for the Tribes. In addition to her years of experience, Patti is a member of the Tulalip Tribes and is well versed in the culture and history of her people. Her personal goal is to invest in the future of the Coast Salish community, helping to affect a sustainable future for the generations to come. https://nr.tulaliptribes.com/Programs/TreatyRightsOffice

Ryan Miller is a Tulalip Tribal member and the Environmental Liaison and Program Manager for the Tulalip Tribes Treaty Rights Office. He has over 12 years of experience working in the Tulalip Natural Resources Department and recently received his degree in Native Environmental Science from Northwest Indian College.

 

ROOM: 1BC

Dr. Brett Kuwada, Psy.D.

Cultural Humility, Empathy, and Compassion: A Framework for Difficult Dialog and Deeper Interpersonal and Organizational Connection

Facilitator: Seconde Nimenya

 

Dr. Brett Kuwada received his BA, from Western Washington University, in East Asian Studies with a focus in Psychology. He also received his MA in Psychology and Doctorate of Psychology from Argosy University, completing his doctoral internship work at the University of Washington. He is currently a professor In the Psychology Department at Everett Community College, and prior to that spent 8 years as a counselor and professor for the college. Dr. Kuwada has also been an adjunct instructor for Western Washington University’s Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Counseling over the past 7 years. Much of his most recent work has been focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion. He has presented at numerous conferences focused on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion, including the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education (NCORE), the annual Resilient Intellectuals Seeking Equity (RISE), the Students of Color Career Conference (SoCCC), and the National Council on Rehabilitation Education’s Annual conference, to name a few.

 

ROOM: 2A

Janice Tufte and Gus Mansour

Islam 202: After the First Salam

Facilitator: Mary Anne Dillon

 

Janice Tufte, raised in Edmonds, is currently active educating groups on the importance to address the social determinants of health, reduce disparities in the fields of health systems research and care delivery. Janice embraced Islam in early 2001 and has been developing resource opportunities within the local Muslim community since. Janice performed her Hajj in Mecca and Medina K.S.A. in 2010.  She presents on Islam locally, and nationally on health systems improvement work. Janice serves on Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry’s Ecumenical Interreligious Dialog Council. www.janicetufte.com

 

Gus Mansour, born in Lebanon, Gus lives in Lynnwood and is a Realtor with John L Scott. Having received his education in Lebanon, Egypt, Texas, Massachusetts, and Seattle, he understands and appreciates the diversity of people and their unique cultures. Gus is active within interfaith communities sharing on the basics of Islam and the intersection and commonalities of the religions. A native Arabic speaker, Gus understands and recites the Quran with beauty that is too often overlooked and/or misunderstood by many.

 

ROOM: 1F

Dr. Yvonne Terrell-Powell

It’s a Leadership Responsibility. If Not You, Then Who?

 

Dr. Yvonne L. Terrell-Powell serves as Vice President for Equity and Inclusion at Edmonds Community College in Lynnwood, WA. She provides executive leadership and helps the college achieve its mission of Teaching, Learning, Community, guided by innovation, equity and inclusion, and a global perspective. Dr. Terrell-Powell has over 20 years of experience in higher education and leading efforts related to diversity, equity, and inclusion, hiring practices, and student success. She is a highly skilled speaker, presenter, teacher, and facilitator. She is the co-author of the Multicultural Competency Interviewing Rubric (MCIR), which focuses on identifying leadership skills that support the development of a transformative multicultural organization.

 

Main Gathering Room (ROOM: 2DE)

AFTERNOON SESSION

 

AFTERNOON KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Dr. Nate Bowling 

Taking a Stand in Polarizing Times

In his 12th year of teaching, Dr. Nate Bowling is a veteran of the United States Air Force Reserves and a graduate of the Evergreen State College. He was a 2014 recipient of the Milken Family Foundation’s National Educator Award, the 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year, and was one of four finalists for the 2016 National Teacher of the Year. Nate was also a recipient of the 2016 Joseph Albert Dear Distinguished Alumni Award from Evergreen. He blogs about teaching, matters of justice, and educational equity at natebowling.com and his writing has been published in The Washington Post, New York Observer, Huffington Post, and the Seattle Times. Nathan is a co-founder of Teachers United, a teacher-led education policy advocacy group, and the host of the Nerd Farmer Podcast. He currently teaches AP Human Geography and AP Government & Politics at Lincoln High School in his hometown of Tacoma, Washington. 

 

ROOM: 1BC

Sharonne Navas

Media and our Implicit Bias

Facilitator: Annie Cole

 

Sharonne Navas is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Equity in Education Coalition. The first American born child of immigrant parents from Guatemala and El Salvador, Sharonne understands, and values, the complexity of being mutli-lingual and multi-cultural in America.  A native of New York City, Sharonne moved to the Seattle area in 2009. Past professions include being a community organizer with Stand for Children, Executive Director of Para Los Niños, Assistant Director of Development for NARAL Pro-Choice America, Deputy Executive Director for Ayuda, Inc., and Development Coordinator for the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. In 2010, she was appointed as Commissioner for the Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs. In 2016, she was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Green River Community College.

 

ROOM: 1D

Jim Henderson and Jim Hancock

NO JOKE PRESENTS Three Practices for Crossing the Difference Divide

Facilitator: Brad Shantz

 

USA TODAY describes Jim Henderson this way: “Henderson has blazed a new path as an innovator, author, self-professed subversive, and leader in the creation of new ways to be publicly and persuasively Christian in the 21st century.” Following 25 years working as a pastor, Jim formed Off The Map, an organization that produced live events designed to help people recover the lost art of being unusually interested in others, especially outsiders. Jim is a speaker, author and producer. He has written eight books. His most subversive act to date was buying an atheist’s soul on Ebay. On the heels of that project, he hired another atheist (Matt Casper) to attend church services with him and write reviews. They recount their experiences in their bestseller, Jim and Casper Go To Church. Jim’s company, Jim Henderson produces live shows for meaning makers. Jim also coaches and consults aspiring writers, artists, and idea entrepreneurs. Jim holds a doctorate in transformational leadership and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Fox News, and on This American Life with Ira Glass.

 

Jim Hancock lives and works among tall trees and blackberry brambles just north of Seattle. He provides creative services for small and medium-sized companies — developing and delivering original content through digital movies, live events, and learning designs. He also writes books — where book is a fluid concept — for teenagers, youth workers, parents, and other adults. He named his practice “The Tiny Company Called Me” because if you hire him, you get him (plus a friend or two as needed).

 

ROOM: 1E

The Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve

Introduction: Our Journey to Becoming the Tulalip People

Facilitator: Marjorie James

 

The Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve's mission is to revive, restore, protect, interpret, collect, and enhance the history, traditional cultural values and spiritual beliefs of the Tulalip Tribes who are the successors in interest to the Snohomish, Snoqualmie, and Skykomish tribes and other tribes and bands signatory to the Treaty of Point Elliott. The Hibulb Cultural Center is approximately 23,000 square feet with a 50-acre natural history preserve. The interactive cultural center features a main exhibit, a temporary exhibit, two classrooms, a longhouse, a research library, and gift shop. It also features a fully certified collections and archaeological repository. It was the first Tribal facility certified by the state of Washington.

 

ROOM: 2BC

Tami L. Farber

Developing a Power Analysis to Guide your Equity Work

Facilitator: Courtney Clementso

 

A native to New York and now planting new roots in the Pacific Northwest, in 2013 Tami Farber became appointed as the VP of Equity, Advancement and Global Engagement for the YMCA's of Snohomish County. With more than 25 years of experience in the fields of child/youth development, education, organizational leadership and community organizing for the nonprofit and private sectors globally. As a social justice activist, she has spent the last decade organizing, training, speaking, and providing leadership development to organizations, academic institutions, communities, and grassroots initiatives specifically focused on equity, justice, and the elimination of institutional oppression. 

She earned her BA from Long Island University, Global College, MSW from Columbia University and completed all course work of the CUNY Graduate Center Social Welfare Ph.D. program with a research focus on stepping beyond Positive Youth Development to Youth Development Social Justice. She received her antiracism training through the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond and is a certified Children’s Yoga Specialist. Tami is an actively engaged member of the Art of Hosting/Art of Participatory Leadership communities globally. 

 

ROOM: 2BC

José L. Garcia-Pabón, PhD

Why Don’t They Come? Latinos in Outreach Programs

 

Dr. José L. García-Pabón is an associate professor and the Washington State University’s Latino Community Studies and Outreach Specialist since 2007.  His work includes the design and implementation of outreach programs to educate and support the Latino and immigrant population. His research and extension agenda include understanding the experience and needs of Latino, immigrant and minority entrepreneurs, farmers, and youth. Further, Dr. García-Pabón provides educational opportunities to Extension faculty, staff and other professionals on cross-cultural communication with underserved, immigrant, and minority communities. 

 

Before WSU, Dr. García-Pabón was the coordinator of the Community Food Systems and Sustainable Agriculture Program at the University of Missouri-Columbia. His 26-year experience working with hard to reach and underserved communities is roughly equally distributed domestically (Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Washington) and internationally (Germany, Peru, Bolivia, Nicaragua).  He has published several articles on cultural competency training, working with Latino/immigrant entrepreneurs and farmers and ranchers.

 

ROOM: 1F

Karena Hooks and Andrea Paull

Making Connections: Culturally Responsive Teaching, Race & the Brain

 

Karena Hooks is the Founder and CEO of Hooks Global, an organization that focuses on professional development, education, and transformation. With over 20 years of training and community engagement experience, Karena is a transformational leader, trainer, certified life coach, and equity strategist. She is committed to developing authentic courageous leaders and strengthening organizations’ commitment to social justice.